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I am trying to get started with Craft, and was added to an existing project as an admin. I have little experience working with CMS, and am having trouble figuring out how to access the actual html/css files, rather than just the dashboard?

I've downloaded the Craft files locally, and have been looking through documentation, but any additional pointers to resources would be appreciated. Thanks!

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Generally when you are looking at the folder structure of a craft install your template files will be in craft/templates/ (from doc root)

craft/templates/ #

This is where all of your site’s templates go.

You can get more info about Craft's folder structure from the docs here: http://buildwithcraft.com/docs/folder-structure

Craft has a standard template path format that applies to each of these cases: a Unix-style file system path to the template file, relative from your craft/templates folder.

If you have a template located at craft/templates/foo/bar.html, the following template paths would point to it:

  • foo/bar
  • foo/bar.html

Index Templates

If you name your template “index.html”, you don’t need to specify it in the template path.

For example, if you have a template located at craft/templates/foo/bar/index.html, the following template paths would point to it:

  • foo/bar
  • foo/bar/index
  • foo/bar/index.html

If you need more information about templating you can also find that in the docs here: http://buildwithcraft.com/docs/templating-overview

As for the CSS files etc, it would really depend on the developer who set the site up, but the first place I would look is inside the public folder or whichever folder is considered the document root of the server.

Hope that helps get you started!

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  • Thanks, this is helpfull! Is there a way to sync these with the other developer's files, or would we have to each work locally and then push through something like git? – user3675 May 19 '15 at 14:59
  • Yeah theres a bunch of different ways really, going down the git route might be a good option as then you have version control and all the obvious benefits that come with that. You could even use something like Transmit Disk mounting (osx) or Webdrive (windows) so you can both run off a staging server or something, even a shared dropbox folder with a local server would work. I guess it's down to preference but I would assume GIT is probably the method preferred by most... – Alec Ritson May 19 '15 at 15:05

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